TOEFL

Test of English as Foreign Language

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The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) test measures the ability of nonnative speakers of English to use and understand English as it is spoken, written, and heard in college and university settings.

Most people take the TOEFL test as a prerequisite for admission into colleges and universities where English is used or required. In addition, many government, licensing, and certification agencies and exchange and scholarship programs use TOEFL scores to evaluate the English proficiency of people for whom English is not their native language.

The TOEFL iBT (Internet-based Test) tests all four language skills that are important for effective communication: reading, listening, speaking and writing. As effective communication includes many skills, the TOEFL iBT introduces the concept of “integrated questions” which combine multiple language skills. You will be asked to:

  • Read, listen, and then speak in response to a question
  • Listen and then speak in response to a question
  • Read, listen, and then write in response to a question
  TOEFL iBT Score Scale

 

 

Section
Score Scale
Listening
0-30
Reading
0-30
Speaking
0-30
Writing
0-30
Total Score
0-120

The total score is the sum of the four skill scores.

  Course Details

 


Duration - 1 1/2 months ( Thrice a week, One and half hour a day )

Course Content

Section I – Listening Comprehension
Section II - Reading Comprehension
Section III – Writing (Essay)
Section IV – Structure & written Expression
Section V – Words & Idioms

Test Practice

· Weekly Tests
· Mock iBTs

ETS TOEFL website : www.ets.org

 

 

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IELTS

International English Language Testing System

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IELTS is designed to test a candidate's English proficiency in the areas of Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking Modules. If you are planning to undertake academic study, it is recommended that you sit for the Academic Reading and Writing Modules.

Many English language learners need IELTS in order to pursue academic or non-academic training. Most Canadian, British, Australian, and New Zealand academic institutions accept IELTS as a basis of assessing English language proficiency. IELTS is also accepted by many professional organisations including the New Zealand Immigration Service, the Australian Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, the Australian Medical Council, the UK General Medical Council and the UK Ministry of Defence.

Everyone, including native English speakers, may be required to prove an official IELTS score in order to seek immigration to some countries. Citizenship and Immigration Canada requires an official IELTS score. (other counties include, for example, Australia and New Zealand.)

· In India, the test is held at 15 test centres, which arrange test administrations according to local demand.
· The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate(UCLES), the British Council and IDP Education Australia jointly manage the IELTS.

  Test Administration:

 


· IELTS tests are administered at centres throughout the world - there are more than 270 centres, in over 100 countries.
· A full list of centres is available on the IELTS website: www.ielts.org
· Most centres conduct a testing session at least once a month and more often at peak times.
· Results are available within two weeks of the test.

 

 
  IELTS Format:

 


All candidates are tested in following four section.
· Listening
· Speaking
· Reading
· Writing

Section Time
No. of Items / Tasks
Limit (min)
Listening
4 sections, 40 items
30
Reading
3 sections, 40 items
60
Writing
2 tasks (150 & 250 words)
60
Speaking
-
10 - 15

 

 
  Scoring pattern in IELTS:

 

 

IELTS provides a profile of a candidate’s ability to use English. Candidates receive scores on a Band Scale from 1 to 9.  A score is reported for each module of the test. The individual module scores are then averaged and rounded to produce an Overall Band Score according to a confidential band score conversion table. Overall Band Scores and Listening and Reading scores are reported in whole and half Bands; Writing and Speaking Band Scores are reported in whole Bands only.

There are total of 40 questions each in Reading and Listening Modules of IELTS. The band scoring system of the 40 questions are mentioned below:

Number of Correct Answers
Score
20
5.5
25
6
28
6.5
30
7
33
7.5
35
8
38
8.5
40
9

 

In writing Module total score for Report writing is 3.6 and for Essay writing is 5.4. This score depends on your ability to write a report and an essay.Similarly, speaking module covers total of 9 score. You will never get the score of speaking in decimal.


 
  Course Details:

 


Duration - 1 1/2 months ( Thrice a week, One and half hour a day )

Course Content :

Section I - Listening

10 Exercises

SectionII - Reading

38 Exercises

SectionIII – Writing

34 Exercises

SectionIV – Speaking

20 Exercises

Test Practice

· Weekly Tests
· Mock Test Practice

 


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GMAT

Graduate Management Admission Test

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The Graduate Management Admission Test is a Standardized test that measures verbal, mathematical and analytical writing skills. It is intended to help the graduate schools of business assess the potential of applicants for advanced study in business and management. Nearly 900 management institutes all over the world (almost all of them in the US) require GMAT scores from each applicant. The GMAT tests the fundamental skills - Reasoning and Comprehension included - and does not require any subject-specific theoretical study.

The test is designed in such a way that it would be unlike any other test you would have taken at school or college. First, the test is computer based and does not have the same set of questions for all the examinees. Further, it does not give you the option of not answering a question (unless, of course, you run out of time at the end). All this because the GMAT is now an entirely Computer based test - the keyboard and mouse do the work of a pen or pencil. The test is scored out of 800 (in multiples of 10), and most scores fall in the range of 500-600.

 

 
  When is GMAT held?

 

 

GMAT tests can be taken all-round-the-year. Unlike other exams, you can choose your own date and time for taking the GMAT. The test is administered five-days-a-week (Monday through Friday), twice-a-day. September to December is the high season for GMAT, so in case you intend to take the test during this period, you need to register very early (say 90 days in advance) to get a date of your choice. Otherwise, registering at least 15 days in advance is mandatory. The GMAT test lasts roughly four hours, and most centres offer two slots : 9 A.M. and 2 P.M.

 

 
  What is a Computer Adaptive Test?

 

 

In a computer adaptive test (CAT), questions are selected while each individual takes the test. At the start of each multiple - choice section of the GMAT, you are presented a question of middle difficulty. As you answer each question, the computer scores that question and uses that information - as well as your responses to any preceding questions and information about the test design to determine which question to present next. As long as you respond correctly to each question, questions of increased difficulty typically will be presented. When you enter incorrect responses, the computer typically will present you with questions of lesser difficulty.

 

 
  Content and Format of the GMAT test:

 

 

The test has three distinct sections : Analytical Writing Ability (AWA), Quantitative, and Verbal. The Quantitative section has two types of questions, Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency, mingled throughout the section. The Verbal Section has three types : Sentence Correction, Critical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension; here too, the questions of each type appear in no set sequence. There are a total of 78 questions, 37 in Quantitative and 41 in Verbal. These have to be done in 75 minutes each.

 

 
  Format of the GMAT-CAT : 

 

 

Section
Questions

Timing

Computer Tutorial

NA

NA
    Analysis of an Issue
    Analysis of an Argument
1 Topic
1 Topic

30 min each

Optional Rest Break
NA

5 min

Quantitative (Problem Solving & Data Sufficiency)
37

75 min

Optional Rest Break

NA

5 min

Verbal (Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, & Sentence Correction)
41

75min

TOTAL
78+2 Essays

4hrs.(approx.)

 

 
  Scoring Pattern in GMAT-CAT:

 

 

The GMAT test results comprise four different scores : a total score (which is the combined verbal and quantitative scores), a separate Verbal score, a separate Quantitative score, and an Analytical Writing score. The total score is reported on a scale from 200 to 800. The Verbal and Quantitative Scores are reported on a scale of 0 to 60. For the AWA score, the scale is from 0 to 6. Note that your AWA performance is not reflected in your total GMAT score (on 800). You get to know your total, verbal, and quantitative score immediately after taking the test. Official GMAT score reports, which include the AWA scores, are mailed approximately two weeks after you take the test and take another ten days or so to reach your address.

In addition to these scores, the score report also contains percents (%) below. These "% below" indicate the percentage of examinees who scored below you based on the scores of the entire GMAT testing population for the most recent three-year period. These percentages are important in considering how an applicant for admission to a particular management school compares with everyone in the specified period, with all other applicants to the same school, and with students already enrolled at the school.

 

 
  Eligibility :

 

 

Anyone and everyone is eligible for taking the GMAT - there are no restrictions based on age or qualifications. The test scores are valid for five years, i.e., most universities accept scores up to five years old. But it is always better if your scores are recent (not older than 2 years)

 

 
  Course Details:

 

 

Duration - 1 1/2 months ( Thrice a week, One and half hour a day )

Course Content:

Section I – Mathematics

· Basic Arithmetic
· Simple Equations
· Inequalities
· Ratio, Proportion & Variation
· Averages
· Percentages
· Profit & Loss
· Time & Distance
· Time & Work
· Probability
· Lines, Angles & Triangles
· Quadrilaterals
· Circles
· Solid Geometry
· Co-ordinate Geometry

Section II – Analytical Writing

· Analysis of an Issue
· Analysis of an Argument

Section III - Quantitative Analysis

· Problem Solving
· Data sufficiency

Section IV – Verbal

· Reading Comprehension
· Critical Reasoning
· Sentence Correction

Test Practice

· Weekly Tests
· Mock Test Practice

GMAT Website : www.mba.com

 

 

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GRE

Graduate Record Examination

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The Graduate Record Examination is a Standardized test that measures verbal, mathematical and analytical skills. It is intended to help the graduate schools (of all fields other than business) assess the potential of applicants for advanced study . Nearly 2300 universities in the US require GRE scores from each applicant.

The GRE tests the fundamental skills - Reasoning and Comprehension included - and does not require any subject-specific theoretical study. (This is true only for the General GRE Test, and not the GRE Subject, which is required by certain universities. In this section, we mean the General GRE Test whenever we refer to the GRE Test)

 

 
  When is GRE held?

 

 

GRE tests can be taken all-round-the-year. Unlike other exams, you can choose your own date and time for taking the GRE. The test is administered five-days-a-week (Monday through Friday), twice-a-day. September to December is the high season for GRE, so in case you intend to take the test during this period, you need to register very early (say 90 days in advance) to get a date of your choice. Otherwise, registering at least 15 days in advance is mandatory. The GRE test lasts roughly four hours, and most centres offer two slots : 9 A.M. and 2 P.M.

 
  What is a Computer Adaptive Test?

 

 

In a computer adaptive test (CAT), questions are selected while each individual takes the test. At the start of each multiple - choice section of the GRE, you are presented a question of middle difficulty. As you answer each question, the computer scores that question and uses that information - as well as your responses to any preceding questions and information about the test design to determine which question to present next. As long as you respond correctly to each question, questions of increased difficulty typically will be presented. When you enter incorrect responses, the computer typically will present you with questions of lesser difficulty.

 

 
  Content and Format of the GRE test:

 

 

The test has three distinct sections : Writing Assessment (WA), Quantitative, and Verbal. The Quantitative section has Problem Solving questions, which test your mathematical skills and concepts of roughly the high-school level. The Verbal Section has four types of questions : Antonyms, Analogies, Reading Comprehension, and Sentence Completion. The questions of each type appear in no set sequence. There are a total of 58 questions, 28 in Quantitative and 30 in Verbal. The third section, Analytical Writing Assessment measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills. It consists of two analytical writing tasks : (1) "Present your perspective on an issue", and (2) "Analyze an Argument".

There is a one-minute break between each test section. Midway through the testing session, an on-screen message will inform you of the opportunity to take a 10-minute break. Section timing will not stop if you take an unscheduled break.

 

Section
Questions

Timing

Analytical Writing:
Analysis of an issue
Analyze an Argument
1 Topic each
45 min.
30 min.
Verbal Section
30
30 min
Quantitative
28
45 min
Experimental Section
varies
varies
 
TOTAL:
2 hour 15 min (approx.)

An unidentified verbal or quantitative experimental section may be included and may appear in any order after the analytical writing section. It is not counted as part of your score.

 

 
  Eligibility :

 

 

Anyone and everyone is eligible for taking the GRE - there are no restrictions based on age or qualifications. The test scores are valid for five years, i.e., most universities accept scores up to five years old. But it is always better if your scores are recent (not older than 2 years)

 

 
  Course Details :

 

 


Duration - 1 1/2 months ( Thrice a week, One and half hour a day )

Course Content

Section I – Mathematics

· Basic Arithmetic
· Simple Equations
· Inequalities
· Ratio, Proportion & Variation
· Averages
· Percentages
· Profit & Loss
· Time & Distance
· Time & Work
· Probability
· Lines, Angles & Triangles
· Quadrilaterals
· Circles
· Solid Geometry
· Co-ordinate Geometry

Section II – Analytical Writing

· Analysis of an Issue
· Analysis of an Argument

Section III - Quantitative Analysis

· Problem Solving
· Data sufficiency

Section IV – Verbal

· Reading Comprehension
· Analogies
· Antonyms
· Sentence Correction

Test Practice

· Weekly Tests
· Mock Test Practice

 

GRE Website : www.ets.org

 

 

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SAT

Scholatic Aptitude Test

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Nearly every college in America accepts the SAT or Subject Tests as a part of its admissions process. That's why more than two million students take the SAT every year.It is a test for students seeking admissions into Undergraduate programs in US and other countries leading to Bachelors Degree. It is a 3 hours and 45 minutes test in which all multiple choice questions are scored the same: one point for each correct answer and one quarter point subtracted for a wrong answer.

 

  When Is SAT Held?


 

The SAT is offered seven times each year. SAT test dates for 2007 are:

  • May 5, 2007
  • June 2, 2007
  • October 6, 2007
  • November 3, 2007
  • December 1, 2007

 

  Content and Format of the SAT test:

 

 

Section
No of Questions
Critical Reading
Sentence Completion
19
Passage based reading
48
Math
Standard Multiple Choice
44
Student produced response questions
10
Writing
Improving Sentance
25
Identifying Sentence Errors
18
Improving Paragraph
6

 

  How is the Test Score Calculated?

 

 

In order to reach the number you see on your score report, two calculations must take place.

First, your "raw score" is calculated. This is the number of points you earned, based on the number of questions you answered correctly, minus a fraction of the number answered incorrectly. Questions you skipped are not counted and no points are subtracted for incorrect Student Produced Response mathematics questions (grid-ins) on the SAT Reasoning Test.

Reasoning Test: Calculating the Raw Score

Each CORRECT answer: add (+) 1 point

Each WRONG answer for a

  • Multiple-choice question: subtract (-) 1/4 of a point
  • Student-produced response: no points subtracted

Each OMITTED question: no points subtracted

Subject Tests: Calculating the Raw Score

Each CORRECT answer: add (+) 1 point

Each WRONG answer for a

  • 5-choice question: subtract (-) 1/4 of a point
  • 4-choice question :subtract (-) 1/3 of a point
  • 3-choice question: subtract (-) 1/2 of a point

Each OMITTED question: no points subtracted

Scaled Score

Your raw score is then converted to a scaled score (reported on a 200-to-800 scale) by a statistical process called equating. Equating ensures that the different forms of the test or the level of ability of the students with whom you are tested do not affect your score. Equating makes it possible to make comparisons among test takers who take different editions of the test across different administrations.

See below for how the ELPT™ (English Language Proficiency Test™) is scored.

Subscores

Writing Section Subscores

The raw scores for the multiple-choice writing section are converted to scaled scores that are reported on a 20-80 scale. Every SAT Reasoning Test contains a 25-minute essay. The essay subscore is reported on a 2-12 scale. (Essays that are not written on the essay assignment, or which are considered illegible after several attempts at reading, receive a score of 0.) Each essay is independently scored from 1 to 6 by two readers. These readers' scores are combined to produce the 2-12 scale. If the two readers' scores differ by more than one point, a third reader will score the essay. The multiple-choice writing section counts for approximately 70% and the essay counts for approximately 30% of your total raw score, which is used to calculate your 200-to-800 score.

Subject Test Subscores

Subscores on the Subject Tests are used to compute the total score, but their individual contributions differ between the different tests. Subscores are reported on a 20-to-80 scale. For the French, German, and Spanish with Listening tests, the reading subscore counts twice as much as the listening subscore. For the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tests, subscores are weighted equally. For the Subject Test in Writing (prior to March 2005) the multiple-choice subscore counts twice as much as the essay subscore.

 

  Scoring in SAT:

 

 

Colleges use SAT scores to determine whether or not you will be a good fit for their school. Though SAT scores are important, they are not the only factor that schools look at during the admissions process. Colleges also consider essays, interviews, recommendations, community involvement, your high school GPA, and much more. Even so, your chances of acceptance increase if you have a high SAT score.

Average Scores :
The SAT has three sections and three scores, each on a scale of 200 to 800.

  • Writing (200-800)
  • Math (200-800)
  • Critical Reading (200-800)
The average total score is approximately 1,538 points (520 in Math, 510 in Writing, and 508 in Critical Reasoning).

An average score is acceptable for most colleges and universities. However, some of the top schools will expect you to achieve an SAT score of 2,100 of more. A score above 2,100 puts you in the 90th percentile, meaning that you scored better on the test than 90% of test takers.

Perfect Scores
A perfect score is 2,400 points. Approximately 1,000,000 students take the SAT each year and on average, only 20 of them get a perfect score.

 

 

  Course Details:

 

 

Duration - 1 1/2 months ( Thrice a week, One and half hour a day )

Course Content

Section I – Mathematics

· Basic Arithmetic
· Simple Equations
· Inequalities
· Ratio, Proportion & Variation
· Averages
· Percentages
· Profit & Loss
· Time & Distance
· Time & Work
· Probability
· Lines, Angles & Triangles
· Quadrilaterals
· Circles
· Solid Geometry
· Co-ordinate Geometry

Section II - Quantitative Analysis

20 exercises each of 100 problems

Section III – Analogies

12 exercises

Section IV - Sentence completion

12 exercises

Section V - Reading Passage

12 exercises

Test Practice

· Weekly Tests
· Mock Test Practice

SAT Website : http://www.collegeboard.com